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Drew's Blog

  • Drew's Blog New Houses Featured - Drew Macintosh Serving You Always In All Ways

    New Houses Featured on Selected Locations

    Whether you're an empty nester moving from a house into a condo, or a renter trading in a two-bedroom for a studio, ...
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  • Drew's Blog Latest News - Drew Macintosh Serving You Always In All Ways

    Lates News on Orillia. ON CA.

    Home selling in autumn is the second best time of the year to sell a home. Families have returned from summer vacations...
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Welcome

This is a website designed for you, the discerning buyer or seller of Orillia real estate. You want nothing less than a Realtor who has demonstrated professionalism, integrity and unsurpassed success specializing in Orillia real estate and distinctive properties fronting on the Twin Lakes of Simcoe and Couchiching. You've come to the right place. As a Realtor Drew MacIntosh is excited to offer you his services as a Sales Representative with RE/MAX Orillia Realty (1996) Limited, Brokerage. He is ready to represent buyers and sellers with the same incomparable energy, experience and market knowledge he has offered all of his past and current clients in Ontario's Simcoe County.

Orillia real estate consists of stately historic Victorian homes, Post War Bungalows, New Builds in every price range, and of course phenomenal Water Front Properties. Drew invites you to browse his Listings page, search all available real estate in the Find My Dream Home section and get to know him as he shares his knowledge and interests in Drew's Blog. Feel free to contact him anytime at 705.345.9371. or via email, drew@remaxorillia.com.
Drew Macintosh - Drew Macintosh Serving You Always In All Ways

Drew Macintosh

Sales Representative
705.345.9371 Drew@remaxorillia.com Connect with us at:
REMAX Orillia Realty - Drew Macintosh 705.325.1373

Whether you’re an empty nester moving from a house into a condo, or a renter trading in a two-bedroom for a studio, you’ll have to say sayonara to some of your stuff. Stressed out by the prospect? Don’t be. Sarah Moyse and Jennie Davidson, Toronto-based moving planners and owners of Wren Designs, offer 10 tips designed to make downsizing a snap!

1. Write a list of all the items you love and can’t live without; it will help you bid adieu to things that didn’t make the list. “It’s hard to persuade people they can’t take everything with them,” Sarah says. “But by keeping what’s on your wish list, you won’t be upset about the things you can’t keep.”

2. Start thinning out your belongings at least three months before the move. Take some time each day, or one morning each week, to go through that jammed coat closet or overflowing filing cabinet. “Paper is the real killer,” Jennie says, so tackle it one box at a time. The same goes for photos, which require a lot of attention.

3. Get a feel for the size of your new rooms by comparing them to rooms of similar dimensions in your present home. For instance, your living-room-to-be might be roughly the same size as your current bedroom. You may think you can squeeze in two sofas, but this kind of reality check could help you realize that only one will fit comfortably.

4. Heavily edit areas with items that don’t have as much sentimental value. Take the kitchen, for example; most people don’t need 10 mixing bowls and won’t get teary-eyed over losing a second spatula. If you’re downsizing from a house to a condo, target the garage. Snow shovels, the lawn mower, ladders – you won’t need any of them.

5. Don’t throw anything in the garbage. Recycle, reuse, sell and donate instead. As tempting and easy as it is to pitch wire hangers, musty clothes and shabby furnishings, be environmentally responsible and find a home for everything. A can of Comet with a few shakes of powder left could make someone else’s sink sparkle if you don’t want it; consider giving supplies to a shelter, neighbour or cleaning lady.

6. Label three bins To Keep, To Sell and Charity (bins should be manageable when full). For the average downsize, keep only one-third to one-half of your belongings, say Sarah and Jennie.

7. Get an objective opinion. If you can’t decide whether to keep or kiss that dusty ’70s-era sewing machine goodbye, Sarah says, “It’s good to have someone who’ll say, ‘Oh, please, you never use that!'” It might just be the kick you need.

8. When selling your goods, try an auction for high-end items. Then look for reputable antique and secondhand dealers. Often, they can buy all of your wares or put you in touch with booksellers and other specialty dealers. “Some dealers will come to your home, take what you don’t want and even drop off the charity stuff,” Sarah says. “That way you won’t be trudging all over town.” If you can’t sell an item, donate it to a shelter.

9. Use floor plans to prearrange your furniture before the move. This is another useful reality check. To start, draw plans if you don’t have any, and sketch in a furniturelayout. Then look at the plans realistically; if you’ve crammed in side tables, armoires and chairs, you need to edit more. Don’t wait until after you move to contend with furniture you’ll just end up tripping over.

10. Once you get to the packing stage, use a colour-coded system to organize all of your boxes. Choose a colour for each room and mark the boxes destined for that room with a coordinating colour sticker. You can also do the same thing numerically; for example, if room No. 1 is the kitchen, then all boxes marked No. 1 will go there. A simple and efficient organizing idea to make the move that much easier!

Home selling in autumn is the second best time of the year to sell a home. Families have returned from summer vacations. Kids have gone back to school. The holidays aren’t yet upon us, at least not yet in an annoying way. We are set to enjoy 75 to 80 days of normalcy, and that’s a great time to sell a home.

People are happy and relaxed as the temperature begins to drop. It’s not just sweater weather that creates static electricity in autumn; it’s the scurrying of agents diligently working to pop a few more sales into the hopper before third quarter sales results are posted.

Here are some tips for attracting the autumn home buyer:

Clean Up the Yard

Rake dead leaves and debris in your lawn. Don’t let overgrown vegetation block the windows or path to the entrance. Cutting bushes and tree limbs will let the sun inside and showcase the exterior of your home. Cut away summer vines and cut down dead flowers.

Create Autumn Curb Appeal

The most popular autumn flowers are chrysanthemums (or mums) and they bloom for a long time. I am also partial to marigolds for fall. Both mums and marigolds are available in yellow, which is a home selling color. Plant them in pots. Place pots on the steps and along the sidewalk. Accent with pumpkins.

Dress the Windows

Rain and wind from over the summer months can make your windows dusty and streaked by autumn.

You might not notice smudges, but buyers will, if only on a subconscious level. To sell a home, your windows need to sparkle. Even though I am not selling my home, my cats routinely rub their little noses on the inside glass while walking along window ledges, so I need to wash my windows inside and out every autumn. Remove screens and spray them down.

Check the HVAC

You want the air inside your home to smell fresh. When was the last time you changed your furnace filter? You can buy 90-day furnace filters. Have the HVAC system checked before you need to turn on the heat. Besides, the buyer will ask a home inspector to look at your HVAC. If you discover problems with your furnace, it’s better to fix them before your home goes on the market.

Clean Out the Fireplace

Ah, nothing smells like autumn than smoke from a wood-burning fireplace. However, in some parts of the country, burning wood indoors or outdoors is outlawed. In Sacramento, we have certain days when we are not allowed to burn wood in the fireplace. If you have a gas fireplace, light it when buyers come through. If the fireplace is filled with cobwebs because it hasn’t been used for months, vacuum it out and wash it down. Some home stagers arrange knickknacks in the fireplace in place of wood logs.
Set the Autumn Mood Musically

When I think of autumn music, beyond “See You in September” and “California Dreamin’,” polka music and accordions come to mind. German beer fests are always held in October. But that doesn’t seem appropriate for autumn home selling unless you’re entertaining a frat house. I suspect a home seller is better off with Enya’s “The First of Autumn” or George Winston’s new age piano album “Autumn.”

Utilize Autumn Accent Colors

You don’t need to dump a lifeless sofa when you can accessorize its dullness with bright red, orange and / or golden yellow pillows. Toss a quilt or autumn-colored throw over a chair. After you’ve cleared away the clutter and depersonalized each room, bring a little bit of autumn hues to each room by placing bold-colored accent pieces in odd groupings such as 3’s and 5’s. Create an autumn centerpiece for the dining room table by arranging pine cones and nuts around orange candles, stick in a few leaves from the yard.

Turn on the Lights

Above all, bring in the light. When days get shorter, the sun sets lower in the horizon and casts wider shadows. Pull up the blinds, open the shutters, push back the drapes on every window. Turn on every light in the house, including appliance lights and closet lights. Brighten darker rooms with few windows by placing spotlights on the floor behind furniture, and for goodness sakes, turn off the TV.

Offer Parting Treats

I like to leave a guest book by the door for people to leave comments about the home. Gathering buyer feedback can be crucial. And buyers will feel more compelled to leave you a note if you give them something in return. Like tiny packets of candy corn or those snack-sized candy bars — oh, I love Snickers bars like no tomorrow. Or you can go all-out and leave a tray of individually wrapped caramelized apples, tied with a curling ribbon.